Trichotillomania—Has Hair Pulling Become a Problem?

Does your child have a hair pulling disorder?   Do they do this excessively? Do you see places where the hair is missing?  If you answered yes then your child may be suffering from a childhood habit disorder which is referred to as Trichotillomania.   This is a condition that happens to children and is considered an impulse-control disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD hair pulling).

Watch this amazing video that can virtually helps end your hair pulling for you, all in the comfort of your own home. That’s how I ended my hair pulling compulsions in an Un-traditional way, easily and permanently…

This is not just hair pulling from the head but any hair that grows on the body in any place on the body.  It can be eyelashes or eyebrows or from the genital area and the consequences of this impulse-control disorder can be bald patches to barely noticeable.

The reason for the hair pulling disorder is not clinically understood as yet because it can happen whether the child is feeling really anxious or very calm.  The child does seem to use the hair pulling as a way to relieve built-up tension, for whatever reason, and after the hair is pulled out the child experiences a feeling of satisfaction.  It makes them feel better.  This feeling of release seems to drive the child into the behavior pattern of an OCD hair pulling.  This strange behavior has become the child’s method of coping.

There are five symptoms that a child with hair pulling disorder or OCD hair pulling will exhibit:

  • The child seems to get a lot of release or happiness or a sense of satisfaction from hair pulling.
  • There is very visible evidence where hair has been pulled out because the child is doing this on a consistent basis.
  • When the child is told to stop pulling out hair, their anxiety is increased or if they are very nervous just before they pull out hair.
  • If the child’s ability to interact with others is compromised by their hair pulling disorder, if it causes problems in school or any other places where they need to relate comfortably.
  • There is no other type of mental disorder or OCD hair pulling that would account for the behavior pattern of pulling out hair and there is no other type of medical condition that would account for the missing hair.

Hair pulling is not a behavior that is connected to any particular ethnic background or gender and is found most frequently in the childhood years.  Because the child has grown to become accustomed to depending on this behavior to get relief from built-up tensions, it grows into an OCD hair pulling.  Their first instinctive response to building anxiousness is to start pulling out hair.  Some are very embarrassed when their need to pull hair is discovered which only exacerbates their need to pull more hair.  When they begin to feel ashamed of what they feel they must do to cope, it will begin to interfere with their normal functioning and active life style.  If you have observed the hair pulling disorder in your child, do not hesitate to consult with your health care professional for immediate diagnosis and treatment.

Watch this amazing video that can virtually helps end your hair pulling for you, all in the comfort of your own home. That’s how I ended my hair pulling compulsions in an Un-traditional way, easily and permanently…

Popularity: 56% [?]

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Help Trichotillomania Patients With The Use Of TCAs

Trichotillomania, a case of excessive psychological hair pulling, is getting much attention nowadays. This is a very unique disorder whose etiology or root cause is not that specific. Its severity is also varied, as well as, its receptivity to treatment. Some cases will prove to be managed a lot easier than others. Especially when the compulsion to pull hair is already very difficult to control, the person will easily become distracted from thinking of other things aside from the fact that he or she wants to pull some hair out. Hence, it is but encouraged to help trichotillomania patients in whatever therapeutic way possible.
Trichotillomania is more of an addiction. It starts with a small interest to pull some hair then it later develops into a hard to control habit. What’s even worse is if it evolves into an obsession wherein the patient can no longer stop doing the act of pulling hair. Also known as ‘trich’ or TTM, this condition warrants immediate attention. If the patient already becomes uncontrollably obsessed with the habit, then it may prove to be harmful to his or her general wellbeing. One can help trichotillomania patients by encouraging them to ask for prescription medications that will help counter their anxieties and compulsive behaviors.
In this connection, many medications like antidepressants are used for trichotillomania. The group of drugs known as TCA or tricyclic antidepressants is also one of the most commonly used TTM drug today. Although this is relatively an older classification of antidepressant compared to its more modern successors, TCAs are still seen to be effective in treating health conditions that are caused by certain anxieties, compulsions and depressions. Some of the most popular tricyclic antidepressants being circulated in the market are amitriptyline, amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine and nortryptyline among others.
Tricyclic antidepressants have been widely acknowledged for their action in hindering the reuptake of certain neurotransmitters like dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. All of which, have been known to directly or indirectly influence some odd behaviors that lead to psychological pathologies. The blocking action of the TCAs will slowly stop the occurrence of the behaviors that are said to be causing the hair pulling diseases. By blocking the reuptake of the said neurotransmitters, certain compulsive thoughts (in this case the pulling of hair) will be disrupted. Thus, a therapeutic response is initiated.
Depending on the specific case of other trichotillomania patients, other doctors or therapists may prescribe some other forms of antidepressants like SSRIs and MAOIs. Nevertheless, these drugs can really help trichotillomania patients in controlling their ‘odd’ behavior to some manageable degree. Although the theory on the exact link of these medications to completely cure the disease is still to be clearly mapped out, some latest trichotillomania breakthroughs have already been witnessed with the help of these antidepressants.

Trichotillomania, a case of excessive psychological hair pulling, is getting much attention nowadays. This is a very unique disorder whose etiology or root cause is not that specific. Its severity is also varied, as well as, its receptivity to treatment. Some cases will prove to be managed a lot easier than others. Especially when the compulsion to pull hair is already very difficult to control, the person will easily become distracted from thinking of other things aside from the fact that he or she wants to pull some hair out. Hence, it is but encouraged to help trichotillomania patients in whatever therapeutic way possible.

Trichotillomania is more of an addiction. It starts with a small interest to pull some hair then it later develops into a hard to control habit. What’s even worse is if it evolves into an obsession wherein the patient can no longer stop doing the act of pulling hair. Also known as ‘trich’ or TTM, this condition warrants immediate attention. If the patient already becomes uncontrollably obsessed with the habit, then it may prove to be harmful to his or her general wellbeing. One can help trichotillomania patients by encouraging them to ask for prescription medications that will help counter their anxieties and compulsive behaviors.

In this connection, many medications like antidepressants are used for trichotillomania. The group of drugs known as TCA or tricyclic antidepressants is also one of the most commonly used TTM drug today. Although this is relatively an older classification of antidepressant compared to its more modern successors, TCAs are still seen to be effective in treating health conditions that are caused by certain anxieties, compulsions and depressions. Some of the most popular tricyclic antidepressants being circulated in the market are amitriptyline, amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine and nortryptyline among others.

Tricyclic antidepressants have been widely acknowledged for their action in hindering the reuptake of certain neurotransmitters like dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. All of which, have been known to directly or indirectly influence some odd behaviors that lead to psychological pathologies. The blocking action of the TCAs will slowly stop the occurrence of the behaviors that are said to be causing the hair pulling diseases. By blocking the reuptake of the said neurotransmitters, certain compulsive thoughts (in this case the pulling of hair) will be disrupted. Thus, a therapeutic response is initiated.

Depending on the specific case of other trichotillomania patients, other doctors or therapists may prescribe some other forms of antidepressants like SSRIs and MAOIs. Nevertheless, these drugs can really help trichotillomania patients in controlling their ‘odd’ behavior to some manageable degree. Although the theory on the exact link of these medications to completely cure the disease is still to be clearly mapped out, some latest trichotillomania breakthroughs have already been witnessed with the help of these antidepressants.

 

Watch this amazing video that can virtually helps end your hair pulling for you, all in the comfort of your own home. That’s how I ended my hair pulling compulsions in an Un-traditional way, easily and permanently…

 

Popularity: 48% [?]

Trichotillomania — Has Hair Pulling Become a Problem?

Does your child have a hair pulling disorder?   Do they do this excessively?  Do you see places where the hair is missing?  If you answered yes then your child may be suffering from a childhood habit disorder which is referred to as Trichotillomania.   This is a condition that happens to children and is considered an impulse-control disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD hair pulling).
This is not just hair pulling from the head but any hair that grows on the body in any place on the body.  It can be eyelashes or eyebrows or from the genital area and the consequences of this impulse-control disorder can be bald patches to barely noticeable.
The reason for the hair pulling disorder is not clinically understood as yet because it can happen whether the child is feeling really anxious or very calm.  The child does seem to use the hair pulling as a way to relieve built-up tension, for whatever reason, and after the hair is pulled out the child experiences a feeling of satisfaction.  It makes them feel better.  This feeling of release seems to drive the child into the behavior pattern of an OCD hair pulling.  This strange behavior has become the child’s method of coping.
There are five symptoms that a child with hair pulling disorder or OCD hair pulling will exhibit:
The child seems to get a lot of release or happiness or a sense of satisfaction from hair pulling.
There is very visible evidence where hair has been pulled out because the child is doing this on a consistent basis.
When the child is told to stop pulling out hair, their anxiety is increased or if they are very nervous just before they pull out hair.
If the child’s ability to interact with others is compromised by their hair pulling disorder, if it causes problems in school or any other places where they need to relate comfortably.
There is no other type of mental disorder or OCD hair pulling that would account for the behavior pattern of pulling out hair and there is no other type of medical condition that would account for the missing hair.
Hair pulling is not a behavior that is connected to any particular ethnic background or gender and is found most frequently in the childhood years.  Because the child has grown to become accustomed to depending on this behavior to get relief from built-up tensions, it grows into an OCD hair pulling.  Their first instinctive response to building anxiousness is to start pulling out hair.  Some are very embarrassed when their need to pull hair is discovered which only exacerbates their need to pull more hair.  When they begin to feel ashamed of what they feel they must do to cope, it will begin to interfere with their normal functioning and active life style.  If you have observed the hair pulling disorder in your child, do not hesitate to consult with your health care professional for immediate diagnosis and treatment.

Does your child have a hair pulling disorder?   Do they do this excessively? Do you see places where the hair is missing?  If you answered yes then your child may be suffering from a childhood habit disorder which is referred to as Trichotillomania.   This is a condition that happens to children and is considered an impulse-control disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD hair pulling).

This is not just hair pulling from the head but any hair that grows on the body in any place on the body.  It can be eyelashes or eyebrows or from the genital area and the consequences of this impulse-control disorder can be bald patches to barely noticeable.

The reason for the hair pulling disorder is not clinically understood as yet because it can happen whether the child is feeling really anxious or very calm.  The child does seem to use the hair pulling as a way to relieve built-up tension, for whatever reason, and after the hair is pulled out the child experiences a feeling of satisfaction.  It makes them feel better.  This feeling of release seems to drive the child into the behavior pattern of an OCD hair pulling.  This strange behavior has become the child’s method of coping.

There are five symptoms that a child with hair pulling disorder or OCD hair pulling will exhibit:

The child seems to get a lot of release or happiness or a sense of satisfaction from hair pulling.

There is very visible evidence where hair has been pulled out because the child is doing this on a consistent basis.

When the child is told to stop pulling out hair, their anxiety is increased or if they are very nervous just before they pull out hair.

If the child’s ability to interact with others is compromised by their hair pulling disorder, if it causes problems in school or any other places where they need to relate comfortably.

There is no other type of mental disorder or OCD hair pulling that would account for the behavior pattern of pulling out hair and there is no other type of medical condition that would account for the missing hair.

Hair pulling is not a behavior that is connected to any particular ethnic background or gender and is found most frequently in the childhood years.  Because the child has grown to become accustomed to depending on this behavior to get relief from built-up tensions, it grows into an OCD hair pulling.  Their first instinctive response to building anxiousness is to start pulling out hair.  Some are very embarrassed when their need to pull hair is discovered which only exacerbates their need to pull more hair.  When they begin to feel ashamed of what they feel they must do to cope, it will begin to interfere with their normal functioning and active life style.  If you have observed the hair pulling disorder in your child, do not hesitate to consult with your health care professional for immediate diagnosis and treatment.

Popularity: 76% [?]

Pulling Hair Disorder – The Arsenal Includes Fluvoxamine (Luvox)

Pulling hair disorder is a listed medical condition – it is widely recognised as trichotillomania. One who suffers from it is given to pulling his or her hair – or in rare cases, even someone else’s hair – sometimes to the point of actually tearing it out. And it is not just a matter of the hair on one’s head; it can include body hair and eyelashes. People do it when they succumb to strong negative emotions. But it is treatable via a number of methods: from behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy to the administration of antidepressant drugs – like Fluvoxamine (Luvox), which is to be discussed later in this self same article. This may sound bizarre, but one may not know he or she has pulling hair disorder. Articles like this can inform people about specific drugs that are used to combat pulling hair disorder – one aim of this one is to provide a closer account of the specific one Fluvoxamine (Luvox).
For the sake of averting ambiguity, it is probably a good idea to always refer to Fluvoxamine (Luvox) as just that, Fluvoxamine (Luvox). For Fluvoxamine (Luvox) is a reproduction of the original form of fluvoxamine, the SSRI antidepressant first launched in 1984 in Switzerland, manufactured by Solvay Pharmaceuticals. This reproduction has existed ever since it was established that Eric Harris had been consuming the drug prior to enacting the Columbine High School massacre of 1999. One may obtain a generic version of Luvox from IVAX Pharmaceuticals Inc. Today people appropriate it in the treatment of pulling hair disorder and other forms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Lots of former sufferers’ accounts state that conquering their condition was no pyrrhic victory. Although, success with the use of drugs – including the particular one discussed here – has been seen to vary considerably. Because cases of pulling hair disorder – trichotillomania or not – are so widely accepted as being rooted in psychological issues, many claim that behavioural therapy would be more recommended in the treatment of it. And such behavioural therapy is not the kind that is only truly to be recognised within the clinic; it is but a matter of learning how to react differently when one feels like tearing hair out again.
For all the drugs that are available to treat this disorder, most people who suffer from may not need to worry about exactly how to acquire any of them; for any good local doctor should be able to recommend a psychologist who would discuss options on a one-to-one basis. And while psychologists are not normally highly knowledgeable about complex medical drugs, you can be fairly confident that they will advocate what might best be described as “habit reversal therapy”.

Pulling hair disorder is a listed medical condition – it is widely recognised as trichotillomania. One who suffers from it is given to pulling his or her hair – or in rare cases, even someone else’s hair – sometimes to the point of actually tearing it out. And it is not just a matter of the hair on one’s head; it can include body hair and eyelashes. People do it when they succumb to strong negative emotions. But it is treatable via a number of methods: from behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy to the administration of antidepressant drugs – like Fluvoxamine (Luvox), which is to be discussed later in this self same article. This may sound bizarre, but one may not know he or she has pulling hair disorder. Articles like this can inform people about specific drugs that are used to combat pulling hair disorder – one aim of this one is to provide a closer account of the specific one Fluvoxamine (Luvox).

For the sake of averting ambiguity, it is probably a good idea to always refer to Fluvoxamine (Luvox) as just that, Fluvoxamine (Luvox). For Fluvoxamine (Luvox) is a reproduction of the original form of fluvoxamine, the SSRI antidepressant first launched in 1984 in Switzerland, manufactured by Solvay Pharmaceuticals. This reproduction has existed ever since it was established that Eric Harris had been consuming the drug prior to enacting the Columbine High School massacre of 1999. One may obtain a generic version of Luvox from IVAX Pharmaceuticals Inc. Today people appropriate it in the treatment of pulling hair disorder and other forms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Lots of former sufferers’ accounts state that conquering their condition was no pyrrhic victory. Although, success with the use of drugs – including the particular one discussed here – has been seen to vary considerably. Because cases of pulling hair disorder – trichotillomania or not – are so widely accepted as being rooted in psychological issues, many claim that behavioural therapy would be more recommended in the treatment of it. And such behavioural therapy is not the kind that is only truly to be recognised within the clinic; it is but a matter of learning how to react differently when one feels like tearing hair out again.

For all the drugs that are available to treat this disorder, most people who suffer from may not need to worry about exactly how to acquire any of them; for any good local doctor should be able to recommend a psychologist who would discuss options on a one-to-one basis. And while psychologists are not normally highly knowledgeable about complex medical drugs, you can be fairly confident that they will advocate what might best be described as “habit reversal therapy”.

Popularity: 79% [?]

Eyelash Pulling – What You Can Do About It

Those who have heard of trichotillomania may have also heard of eyelash pulling. Or maybe pulling eyelashes is something you actually do often while having no idea what “trichotillomania” is. But whatever the contingency is for you: although pulling eyelashes is not as common as normal trichotillomania, people still do it often – be it absent-mindedly or deliberately. It is listed as a medical condition / sign of stress – and it is not as if articles on the subject are limited to those found within health institutions, or those distributed by those working in the health / care / medicine industry.

Many would agree that it would be in their best interests to stop their eyelash pulling – after all, eyelashes protect the eyes as well as having something of a beauty factor. And after all, environmental pollution is by no means limited to outside environments; the number of possible sources of dust in an inside environment is just too numerous to be worth estimating. Pulling eyelashes is not always a matter to be instantly dispelled. But do not worry; if you are pulling eyelashes often enough for it to genuinely concern you, getting advice on curbing it is but a click away these days.

Indeed, eyelash pulling may not seem innocuous, but do not be misled. Normal trichotillomania is not that uncommon – it is a situation that affects more than 2% of the population. And while professionals – such as Dr. Trisha Macnair – say that it usually commences in the puberty-early adulthood period of one’s life, it has been linked to children as young as 8. People have called it a real worry to see their young ones pulling eyelashes, and who can blame them?

There are simple techniques you can apply to reduce your eyelash pulling. “Simple”, because there are easy to follow – even if you will not necessarily master them straight away.

It starts with becoming aware of when you feel the urge to pull your eyelashes. Then, you develop a habit of not pulling them, if that makes any sense – change your reaction.

Go and buy some Vaseline, to rub on your eyelashes to make them more slippery.

Think of what else you can do with your hands when the urge arises, and get into doing that alternative.

The psychological implications of breaking the habit of eyelash pulling are great. You may want to do it when you are bored. Learn to relax by doing something like yoga, or even experiment with hypnosis. And if you can, try to identify what “triggers” you to making you want to pull out an eyelash. Keeping active and occupied should help too.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 100% [?]

Children Pulling Hair? Ask The Experts

Few topics are as common in society as stress – and, of course, how it shows. Symptoms of everyday stress often show in one’s body language. It is by no means only common in the workplace. Maybe – just maybe – you have seen children pulling hair as they go about growing up in this often heartless and frequently dangerous world. You might want to provide them advice to stop pulling out hair, such as that offered by this article.

Children pulling hair may quickly take note of those who would show evidence that hair-pulling is officially recognised as a disorder by the international medical community. To be more specific: it is an anxiety disorder covered by developmental and behavioural paediatrics – the international medical community remarks that pulling hair persistently and to excess can lead to hair loss. And although this may sound incredibly silly to some, there is actually such a word as trichotillomania (link to dermatology in medical science); the word has its origins in Greek, and it means “hair pulling madness”. And even though it is by no means as dangerous as anything liable to result in a broken bone or spine, or a ruptured vein or artery etc. it is still categorised as a “physically damaging behaviour”. It makes sense to try to stop pulling out hair.

Given all this, watching children pulling hair is not a pretty sight, is it? But when is it appropriate to seek professional advice to see a child stop pulling out hair? Dr. Trisha Macnair points out that just because your son or daughter may be pulling his or her hair, this does not mean that there is a mental illness requiring urgent examination. And research shows that while trichotillomania sufferers have an otherwise healthy psyche, it is common for it to be linked to depression and anxiety and similar problems. The same woman says that it is rather common – it affects no less than 2% of the population. Usually it starts around puberty or early adulthood. And it is not just head hair that is pulled out, a victim may pull out body hair as well. There may be a hereditary factor in trichotillomania, but some also list environmental pollution, streptococcal infections, or a lack of sufficient brain and body chemicals and nutrients, as being to blame.

If you’re dealing with children pulling hair, the first thing to do is to assure him or her that help to stop pulling out hair is available from a GP.

Cognitive behavioural therapy is one suggestion for children pulling hair.

Or try drug treatments to see your child stop pulling out hair.

Hypnosis is another option.

As is diet and biofeedback.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 85% [?]

Trichotillomania Children

Are your children trichotillomania children? Yes? No? Maybe? Or maybe would it be more appropriate to expect a response like, “I really have no idea!” or “What on Earth are you talking about?” Let’s begin at the beginning, with an explanation of what “trichotillomania” is, shall we? The word has its roots in Greek; the morphemes vouch for its meaning being “pulling hair madness”. But trichotillomania children don’t just pull their hair; there may be times when they actually pull it out! And if you believe that those who suffer from hair pulling disorders only pull out the hair on their head – and their own hair – well, there is not really any less blunt way to say this, but you are wrong! If you have children, then stop worrying about the loss of your own hair and keep the cat in a safe place for long enough to take some sort of action, because the worst cases can be really ugly! Read on.

Hair pulling children, trichotillomania children – whatever you want to call them – when not being players in dramatic emotional episodes that Amy Winehouse would find it hard to ignore or dispel, have mostly normal lifestyles, even if they will be seen with bald spots in the most unexpected of places. It is just too bad that clinicians have classified it as a habit behaviour, right up there with nail biting and compulsive skin picking (onychophagia and  dermatillomania respectively). OCD and physical disorders, for example stereotypical movement disorder, can be attributed to trichotillomania children. Furthermore, hair pulling children may also feel the need to note that people with hair pulling disorders pull hair because of how it looks or feels at a certain area.

But studies have shown that hair pulling children may suffer not only from social estrangement / alienation, but also decreased cerebellar volume (and who’s to say that the latter, unlike the former, is immediately evident?). NB anxiety and depression – it may be worth pointing out to children that hair pulling children showing these things are likely to be or become trichotillomania children. Children who happen to be hair pulling children should also be warned against developing trichophagia (that is, eating or chewing the hair pulled); while extreme cases of this could be a prelude to Rapunzel’s syndrome and even death, according to some sources. (I suppose tearing hair out violently enough is not that unlikely to result in something like brain haemorrhaging caused by relocated arteries).

…Big Question: how to treat it, get therapy? Drug therapy is an option; look for names like Fluoxetine (Prozac), Fluvoxamine (Luvox), Clomipramine (Anafranil) and Sertraline (Zoloft). Or you could go for hypnotherapy, but the best idea would Habit Reversal Training of psychotherapy which can stop hair puuling children from becoming trichotillomania children.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 76% [?]

Are You Pulling Own Hair? Easy Tips to Stop it Effectively

If you are stressed and you constantly have an urge of pulling own hair out, then there is every possibility that you might be suffering from the hair pulling disorder known as “trichotillomania”. The individuals have such a strong urge of pulling hair that they simply cannot control it resulting in several balding patches over their scalp due to excessive hair pulling.  Trichotillomania sufferers might direly need wigs, artificial eyelashes and other cosmetics to hide those areas where it is evident that they might have plucked their hair out.

Trichotillomania is just like an addiction to certain substance. The individuals suffering from trichotillomania cannot control or monitor their urge of pulling own hair or pulling other’s hair depending upon the severity of the condition. Patients suffering from this hair pulling disorder generally live a normal life. However, one can observe baldness over the scalp or any other body part where hair growth is generally seen or thinning hair in such people. Several patients are unable to curb the urge and are ashamed about it leading to low self esteem levels and difficulty in socializing with people.

Almost 50% of trichotillomania patients somehow involve their mouth and hair together. You can observe trichotillomania sufferers moving the tips of their hair over their lips or they chew on the tips to their hair. Some severe cases lead to “trichophagia” wherein the patient ingests a whole chunk of hair leading to abdominal pain, bowel obstruction, nausea, vomiting, gastro-intestinal bleeding and so on so forth. Once the patient is done with pulling own hair right after that he/she is overwhelmed to pull out another hair.

Patients suffering from this hair pulling disorder are hit by a huge wave of stress, anxiety, or boredom which triggers the urge to pull their own hair. Once the individual gives in to the urge of pulling own hair he/she feels relieved and relaxed. Though it is not a masochistic condition, trichotillomania can be categorized under self mutilation due to the following appalling consequences:

•    Damage to the skin.

•    Permanent hair loss due to damaged hair follicles.

•    Formation of trichobezoar (when hair is ingested).

Though enormous amount of research work has been carried out in order to find perfect treatment for this hair pulling disorder, doctors believe that conjunction of effective medications and psychological therapies works the best. Several psychological therapies like cognitive behavioral therapy, habit reversal training therapy, hypnosis and so on so forth are used to help patients control and monitor the urge of pulling own hair. Certain medications like Fluoxetin, Sertraline, Fluvoxamine, Clomipramine, tricyclic antidepressants and so on so forth can be used to relieve the symptoms of this hair pulling disorder. However the most easiest way to stop patients from pulling own hair is relaxation therapy wherein they relieve their stress by squeezing the stress ball, drawing, reading, writing or engaging in any other activities that keeps them occupied rather than feeling bored.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 90% [?]

Cure Trichotillomania in Five Simple Steps

The first and the foremost way to cure trichotillomania is to know almost everything about it. Hair pulling disorder is basically a mental disorder or variance that leads to several horrid consequences like pathological nail biting, gambling, picking ones own skin, setting up fires, stealing and aggressive behavior and pulling own hair. However, several people have different takes on pulling hair disorder. Some experts believe that it is an anxiety disorder, a tic or addiction whereas others believe that it is an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).  It is interesting to know that the term disorder was given to trichotillomania only 20 years ago.

The foremost danger for these patients is the addiction of pulling own hair in such an extent that it becomes chronic leading to bald spots. Scientists claim that in almost 10% cases, the patients indulge in pulling own hair and eating it. This pathological disorder is called Trichophagia and it eventually causes bezoar or hairball after the ingestion. Individuals suffering from it make use of several pullers like their own fingers, pins, tweezers and much more for pulling own hair. Hence, to cure hair pulling disorder, heavy medical intervention is necessary to avoid several appalling consequences. Several people believe that pulling own hair is done consciously by the patients. However, doctors believe that most of these urges are fulfilled unconsciously.

The onset of the symptoms is between the range of ages from nine to fourteen. Reports claim that more than 75-95% patients suffering from hair pulling disorder are females.  The primary symptoms might lead to several other secondary symptoms like depression or panic attacks. The main root cause of pulling hair disorder is still unclear. However, many people believe that it is a genetic disorder. There are several other people who believe that trichotillomania is a learned behavior thereby refuting its genetic basis.

Many doctors suggest that one can cure in two important ways. The first way of treatment involves the use of drugs or medications whereas the second treatment to stop hair pulling disorder involves the use of psychological intervention.

Medication based therapy: This involves the use of several medications and drugs to cure trichotillomania owing to the fact that its root cause is the chemical imbalance created in the brain.

Psychology based therapy: This involves the use of several behavioral or psychological therapies and training protocols to cure trichotillomania owing to the fact that its root cause is the learned behavior itself.

There are five simple ways to cure trichotillomania. They are as such:

1.    Determination of the root cause: This involves a quick study for the care takers. They should observe the components that trigger the trichotillomania symptoms like pulling own hair and eating it. The triggers can be stress, boredom, unhealthy diet, trauma encountered in childhood and many more. Once these triggers are controlled you can cure trichotillomania.

2.    Adaptation to stress and its triggers: Many doctors believe that the simplest way to cure trichotillomania is to carefully handle your stress within your tolerance limits.

3.    Medications like Prozac, Luvox, Anafranil and so on so forth can cure trichotillomania.

4.    Behavioral therapy: This involves meditations and substitution behavior therapy. There therapies reduce the stress levels and urges significantly and thereby helps you to cure trichotillomania.

5.    Acceptance: The acceptance of the disorder would miraculously lower your stress and thereby helps you to cure trichotillomania.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 89% [?]

Hidden Hair Pulling Treatment Uncovered From Best Treatment Specialists

For those who experience an OCD hair pulling condition known as trichotillomania there can be a lot of embarrassment. Some of you may want to find a hair pulling treatment but be afraid to discuss the condition with anyone. This disease can be difficult to discuss due to the overall embarrassment over the situation.  There are treatments available if you are willing to discuss the problem with your personal doctor or a psychologist. In fact there are a couple of different treatments which have proven to be successful.

If you do get up the courage to ask about a hair pulling treatment:

-    You will find the most commonly used treatment is known as habit reversal therapy. This treatment aims to first determine the circumstances which cause the patient to engage in this self destructive activity and then find solutions other than pulling hair out to deal with them. This hair pulling therapy involves some work on the part of the patient in order to consciously use new methods in situations where their first reaction would be to pull hair out. When a patient effectively follows the training they can effectively break their hair pulling habit.

-    At times antidepressants such as Tricylic antidepressants (TCAs) can be used in conjunction with this therapy in order to enhance the overall effect. Use of such antidepressants has however yielded varying results.

-    The next most commonly used treatment is known as hypnotherapy. Hypnotherapy aims to solve the hair pulling habit by essentially treating the condition at a subconscious level. The aim is to offer more effective and less self destructive methods of dealing with situations which may cause a high degree of anxiety than the current pulling hair habit.  This method is relatively new and so far has only been used on a large scale basis in Europe and the United States. Though new and with limited use throughout the world it has proven itself to offer a fairly high degree of success when performed by a patient and experienced psychologist.

If you are looking for a hair pulling treatment remember it is important that you discuss the condition either with your doctor or a psychologist. The first step to finding a trichotillomania treatment is to admit the problem exists. This can be difficult but if you take the first step your psychologist can recommend a good treatment to help you overcome this hair pulling disorder.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

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