Category Trichotillomania Help

Help Trichotillomania Patients With The Use Of TCAs

Trichotillomania, a case of excessive psychological hair pulling, is getting much attention nowadays. This is a very unique disorder whose etiology or root cause is not that specific. Its severity is also varied, as well as, its receptivity to treatment. Some cases will prove to be managed a lot easier than others. Especially when the compulsion to pull hair is already very difficult to control, the person will easily become distracted from thinking of other things aside from the fact that he or she wants to pull some hair out. Hence, it is but encouraged to help trichotillomania patients in whatever therapeutic way possible.
Trichotillomania is more of an addiction. It starts with a small interest to pull some hair then it later develops into a hard to control habit. What's even worse is if it evolves into an obsession wherein the patient can no longer stop doing the act of pulling hair. Also known as 'trich' or TTM, this condition warrants immediate attention. If the patient already becomes uncontrollably obsessed with the habit, then it may prove to be harmful to his or her general wellbeing. One can help trichotillomania patients by encouraging them to ask for prescription medications that will help counter their anxieties and compulsive behaviors.
In this connection, many medications like antidepressants are used for trichotillomania. The group of drugs known as TCA or tricyclic antidepressants is also one of the most commonly used TTM drug today. Although this is relatively an older classification of antidepressant compared to its more modern successors, TCAs are still seen to be effective in treating health conditions that are caused by certain anxieties, compulsions and depressions. Some of the most popular tricyclic antidepressants being circulated in the market are amitriptyline, amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine and nortryptyline among others.
Tricyclic antidepressants have been widely acknowledged for their action in hindering the reuptake of certain neurotransmitters like dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. All of which, have been known to directly or indirectly influence some odd behaviors that lead to psychological pathologies. The blocking action of the TCAs will slowly stop the occurrence of the behaviors that are said to be causing the hair pulling diseases. By blocking the reuptake of the said neurotransmitters, certain compulsive thoughts (in this case the pulling of hair) will be disrupted. Thus, a therapeutic response is initiated.
Depending on the specific case of other trichotillomania patients, other doctors or therapists may prescribe some other forms of antidepressants like SSRIs and MAOIs. Nevertheless, these drugs can really help trichotillomania patients in controlling their 'odd' behavior to some manageable degree. Although the theory on the exact link of these medications to completely cure the disease is still to be clearly mapped out, some latest trichotillomania breakthroughs have already been witnessed with the help of these antidepressants.

Trichotillomania, a case of excessive psychological hair pulling, is getting much attention nowadays. This is a very unique disorder whose etiology or root cause is not that specific. Its severity is also varied, as well as, its receptivity to treatment. Some cases will prove to be managed a lot easier than others. Especially when the compulsion to pull hair is already very difficult to control, the person will easily become distracted from thinking of other things aside from the fact that he or she wants to pull some hair out. Hence, it is but encouraged to help trichotillomania patients in whatever therapeutic way possible.

Trichotillomania is more of an addiction. It starts with a small interest to pull some hair then it later develops into a hard to control habit. What's even worse is if it evolves into an obsession wherein the patient can no longer stop doing the act of pulling hair. Also known as 'trich' or TTM, this condition warrants immediate attention. If the patient already becomes uncontrollably obsessed with the habit, then it may prove to be harmful to his or her general wellbeing. One can help trichotillomania patients by encouraging them to ask for prescription medications that will help counter their anxieties and compulsive behaviors.

In this connection, many medications like antidepressants are used for trichotillomania. The group of drugs known as TCA or tricyclic antidepressants is also one of the most commonly used TTM drug today. Although this is relatively an older classification of antidepressant compared to its more modern successors, TCAs are still seen to be effective in treating health conditions that are caused by certain anxieties, compulsions and depressions. Some of the most popular tricyclic antidepressants being circulated in the market are amitriptyline, amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine and nortryptyline among others.

Tricyclic antidepressants have been widely acknowledged for their action in hindering the reuptake of certain neurotransmitters like dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. All of which, have been known to directly or indirectly influence some odd behaviors that lead to psychological pathologies. The blocking action of the TCAs will slowly stop the occurrence of the behaviors that are said to be causing the hair pulling diseases. By blocking the reuptake of the said neurotransmitters, certain compulsive thoughts (in this case the pulling of hair) will be disrupted. Thus, a therapeutic response is initiated.

Depending on the specific case of other trichotillomania patients, other doctors or therapists may prescribe some other forms of antidepressants like SSRIs and MAOIs. Nevertheless, these drugs can really help trichotillomania patients in controlling their 'odd' behavior to some manageable degree. Although the theory on the exact link of these medications to completely cure the disease is still to be clearly mapped out, some latest trichotillomania breakthroughs have already been witnessed with the help of these antidepressants.

 

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Popularity: 44% [?]

Pulling Hair Disorder – The Arsenal Includes Fluvoxamine (Luvox)

Pulling hair disorder is a listed medical condition – it is widely recognised as trichotillomania. One who suffers from it is given to pulling his or her hair – or in rare cases, even someone else's hair – sometimes to the point of actually tearing it out. And it is not just a matter of the hair on one's head; it can include body hair and eyelashes. People do it when they succumb to strong negative emotions. But it is treatable via a number of methods: from behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy to the administration of antidepressant drugs – like Fluvoxamine (Luvox), which is to be discussed later in this self same article. This may sound bizarre, but one may not know he or she has pulling hair disorder. Articles like this can inform people about specific drugs that are used to combat pulling hair disorder – one aim of this one is to provide a closer account of the specific one Fluvoxamine (Luvox).
For the sake of averting ambiguity, it is probably a good idea to always refer to Fluvoxamine (Luvox) as just that, Fluvoxamine (Luvox). For Fluvoxamine (Luvox) is a reproduction of the original form of fluvoxamine, the SSRI antidepressant first launched in 1984 in Switzerland, manufactured by Solvay Pharmaceuticals. This reproduction has existed ever since it was established that Eric Harris had been consuming the drug prior to enacting the Columbine High School massacre of 1999. One may obtain a generic version of Luvox from IVAX Pharmaceuticals Inc. Today people appropriate it in the treatment of pulling hair disorder and other forms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Lots of former sufferers' accounts state that conquering their condition was no pyrrhic victory. Although, success with the use of drugs – including the particular one discussed here – has been seen to vary considerably. Because cases of pulling hair disorder – trichotillomania or not – are so widely accepted as being rooted in psychological issues, many claim that behavioural therapy would be more recommended in the treatment of it. And such behavioural therapy is not the kind that is only truly to be recognised within the clinic; it is but a matter of learning how to react differently when one feels like tearing hair out again.
For all the drugs that are available to treat this disorder, most people who suffer from may not need to worry about exactly how to acquire any of them; for any good local doctor should be able to recommend a psychologist who would discuss options on a one-to-one basis. And while psychologists are not normally highly knowledgeable about complex medical drugs, you can be fairly confident that they will advocate what might best be described as “habit reversal therapy”.

Pulling hair disorder is a listed medical condition – it is widely recognised as trichotillomania. One who suffers from it is given to pulling his or her hair – or in rare cases, even someone else's hair – sometimes to the point of actually tearing it out. And it is not just a matter of the hair on one's head; it can include body hair and eyelashes. People do it when they succumb to strong negative emotions. But it is treatable via a number of methods: from behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy to the administration of antidepressant drugs – like Fluvoxamine (Luvox), which is to be discussed later in this self same article. This may sound bizarre, but one may not know he or she has pulling hair disorder. Articles like this can inform people about specific drugs that are used to combat pulling hair disorder – one aim of this one is to provide a closer account of the specific one Fluvoxamine (Luvox).

For the sake of averting ambiguity, it is probably a good idea to always refer to Fluvoxamine (Luvox) as just that, Fluvoxamine (Luvox). For Fluvoxamine (Luvox) is a reproduction of the original form of fluvoxamine, the SSRI antidepressant first launched in 1984 in Switzerland, manufactured by Solvay Pharmaceuticals. This reproduction has existed ever since it was established that Eric Harris had been consuming the drug prior to enacting the Columbine High School massacre of 1999. One may obtain a generic version of Luvox from IVAX Pharmaceuticals Inc. Today people appropriate it in the treatment of pulling hair disorder and other forms of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Lots of former sufferers' accounts state that conquering their condition was no pyrrhic victory. Although, success with the use of drugs – including the particular one discussed here – has been seen to vary considerably. Because cases of pulling hair disorder – trichotillomania or not – are so widely accepted as being rooted in psychological issues, many claim that behavioural therapy would be more recommended in the treatment of it. And such behavioural therapy is not the kind that is only truly to be recognised within the clinic; it is but a matter of learning how to react differently when one feels like tearing hair out again.

For all the drugs that are available to treat this disorder, most people who suffer from may not need to worry about exactly how to acquire any of them; for any good local doctor should be able to recommend a psychologist who would discuss options on a one-to-one basis. And while psychologists are not normally highly knowledgeable about complex medical drugs, you can be fairly confident that they will advocate what might best be described as “habit reversal therapy”.

Popularity: 83% [?]

Hidden Hair Pulling Treatment Uncovered From Best Treatment Specialists

For those who experience an OCD hair pulling condition known as trichotillomania there can be a lot of embarrassment. Some of you may want to find a hair pulling treatment but be afraid to discuss the condition with anyone. This disease can be difficult to discuss due to the overall embarrassment over the situation.  There are treatments available if you are willing to discuss the problem with your personal doctor or a psychologist. In fact there are a couple of different treatments which have proven to be successful.

If you do get up the courage to ask about a hair pulling treatment:

-    You will find the most commonly used treatment is known as habit reversal therapy. This treatment aims to first determine the circumstances which cause the patient to engage in this self destructive activity and then find solutions other than pulling hair out to deal with them. This hair pulling therapy involves some work on the part of the patient in order to consciously use new methods in situations where their first reaction would be to pull hair out. When a patient effectively follows the training they can effectively break their hair pulling habit.

-    At times antidepressants such as Tricylic antidepressants (TCAs) can be used in conjunction with this therapy in order to enhance the overall effect. Use of such antidepressants has however yielded varying results.

-    The next most commonly used treatment is known as hypnotherapy. Hypnotherapy aims to solve the hair pulling habit by essentially treating the condition at a subconscious level. The aim is to offer more effective and less self destructive methods of dealing with situations which may cause a high degree of anxiety than the current pulling hair habit.  This method is relatively new and so far has only been used on a large scale basis in Europe and the United States. Though new and with limited use throughout the world it has proven itself to offer a fairly high degree of success when performed by a patient and experienced psychologist.

If you are looking for a hair pulling treatment remember it is important that you discuss the condition either with your doctor or a psychologist. The first step to finding a trichotillomania treatment is to admit the problem exists. This can be difficult but if you take the first step your psychologist can recommend a good treatment to help you overcome this hair pulling disorder.

Discover how you can join over 132,533 ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of OCD related conditions permanently (including trichotillomania, pulling hair disorder, anxiety & phobias) and had completely stop pulling hair. This method had been medically & psychologist endorsed (recommended by the NHS in the UK).

Popularity: 79% [?]

Stopping Trichotillomania – Simple Yet Effective Steps to Stop It

Believe it or not there is evidence to suggest that as many as two to four percent of the worldwide population suffers from a little known condition known as trichotillomania. If you happen to be one of these people who suffer from this hair pulling disorder then there is some cause for joy. There are ways to stop trichotillomania and live a totally normal life style. This hair pulling disease can be embarrassing and many people who suffer from it have trouble discussing it. In fact most people who suffer from it take extraordinary measures to cover up the hair pulling habit.

There are two common practices used in the United States and Europe to stop trichotillomania and both have been proven to be fairly effective when used properly and by people who are willing to make the effort in order to stop trichotillomania.

The first and most common method to stop trichotillomania is known as habit reversal therapy. It aims to discover the direct cause of the condition. Since the condition appears to be related to a high degree of anxiety in an individual the idea is that if you can find the conditions which bring it on you can find better methods of dealing with these conditions. Through training and practice a patient can effectively overcome the condition and stop trichotillomania.

The second method commonly used though only somewhat widely in the United States and Europe in order to stop trichotillomania is known as hypnotherapy. This treatment method has shown wide success but is a relatively new method of treating the disorder. It aims to deal with the problem at a subconscious level by planting better methods of dealing with anxiety in the subconscious level. This treatment requires an extremely talented hypnotherapist who has a high degree of patience but with the right steps taken it has been found to be very effective when trying to stop trichotillomania.

Some studies have been done on the use of certain antidepressants such as Fluoxetine (Prozac), and Sertraline (Zoloft) in order to treat this hair pulling disorder. At this time, the overall effectiveness of these drugs in treating trichotillomania has varied greatly. Most experts in the field agree that antidepressants will not effectively stop trichotillomania effectively due to the fact that it does not appear to be brought on by depression. There have been some studies however that suggest that using antidepressants in conjunction with another form of therapy can increase the odds that a patient will successfully stop trichotillomania effectively allowing people to overcome the hair pulling habit.

Discover how you can join over 432 trichotillomania ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of pulling hair disorder, and had completely stop pulling hair using an easy 3 step therapy treatment system

Popularity: 44% [?]

What is Trichotillomania?

Have you ever had any experience of meeting someone whose eyebrows are drawn on with pencil? Have you ever seen someone who will twist hair repeatedly before pulling it out?

Trichotillomania is an impulse control disorder that increases with tension and finally pulling hair out of the body. This will be followed by feelings of relief, pleasure or gratification. This can result in noticeable hair loss and also cause significant distress or impairment in various aspects of functioning.

This is like a psychological condition rather than a medical one. As the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual stated it is "better accounted for by another mental disorder and is not due to a general medical condition".

These impluse control disorders refer to conditions where the sufferer is unable to resist the temptation to perform an act that is harmful to others or his/herself.

Trichotillomania is first used by a French dermatologist who began using it in 1889. The term "thrix" is Greek for hair and "tillein" means "to pull". Even though "mania" refers to madness or frenzy, this part of the word is a misnomer as those who have the disorder are not "psychotic", "mad" or "crazy" as the name suggests.

There are many treatment for Trichotillomania and they include individual or group therapy, medications, or other support through written materials and other resources from many different organizations. There is a type of treatment called the Cognitive-Behaviour techniques which can help the person. It includes a two-fold process that involves developing awareness of the situations and events which trigger the hair pulling and then learning alternative behaviours in response to them.

If you or someone you know is suffering from trichotillomania, take heart! There are effective treatments to help you. Your first step is to set an appointment with a professional who has training and experience in this area of practice.

Discover how you can join over 432 trichotillomania ex-sufferers who have already ended their years of pulling hair disorder, and had completely stop pulling hair using an easy 3 step therapy treatment system

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